Dada’s Buttericano buttered coffee recipe



My daily diet has a focus on high quality, healthy saturated fats, primarily from grass-fed pasture-raised animal sources.  Saturated fat is a perfect fuel for the human body, reducing inflammation in the body, reducing unhealthy blood lipids and reducing the risk for heart attack and stroke.  It’s also a phenomenal energy source: unlike carbohydrates which give you a fast sugar high but are followed with a terrible insulin crash.

I also love good coffee — not the expensive smooth arabica bean, but the low quality and strong robusto bean.

Combining the two fuel sources into one is a great drink or even meal replacement, especially on a cold rainy day.

The Name

Espresso with hot water is called an Americano.  This particular recipe uses equal parts of espresso to hot water, so it’s properly called a Lungo, but Butterlungo doesn’t sound so good, does it?

The History

Buttered coffee is popular in South America (usually with goat or yak’s milk), but has its place in some European customs as well.  Americans tend to add milk or half-and-half to coffee; half-and-half is half milk, half cream — we’re already adding dairy to our morning blend.

Buttered Coffee Recipe

  • 2 ounces fresh pressed espresso (robusto beans)
  • 2 ounces grass-fed pasture-raised butter, unsalted (Kerrygold is good)
  • 2 ounces hot water

Melt the butter (my favorite way is to place the butter into a small glass and put the glass in boiling water on the stove) and pour the near-boiling butter into your mug.  Press 2 cups of espresso into the mug, lightly mixing the butter with the coffee.  Pour 2 ounces of hot water from your pan used to melt the butter into the cup, and mix some more until you get a nice butter froth on top.  Consume slowly.

The butter will eventually separate into fat globules on top of the coffee — the buttery flavor is stronger, and your lips get a nice balm.

What about flavor?

Butter is a near-equivalent to heavy cream already.  If you take a container of heavy cream and shake it vigorously for just a minute, you end up with butter.  Many people add heavy cream to coffee already, so there’s little difference between the two.

Also, one of the chemical contents of natural coffee is acetylmethylcarbinol — this is the same chemical that is used to flavor artificial butter used in movie theaters.  Coffee already has a butter flavor, and real grass-fed pasture-raised butter only brings it out further.

Health Benefits

When coffee is heated to over 160 degrees (as it normally is), a chemical in the coffee called trigonelline breaks down into niacin (vitamin B3).  One cup of Dada’s Buttericano contains approximately 1/2 your daily niacin (B3) needs.  Also, trigonelline naturally breaks down into pyridine, which also prevents Streptococcus bacteria from binding to your teeth, which causes cavities.  Coffee is a natural tooth protector.

The fat content from grass-fed pasture-raised butter is 70% saturated and 29% monounsaturated.  This is good fat.  Unsaturated fats become rancid quickly, increasing inflammation in the blood and body.  Saturated fats are very stable, and grass-fed pastured butter is extra stable.  Also, the remaining 1% polyunsaturated fats in healthy butter are mostly omega-3 fats — the good kind.  The animal sourced omega-3 fats are even healthier than vegetable sourced omega-3s.

Because the liver breaks down fats efficiently, butter can also help detoxify your liver after a weekend of drinking.  Follow up a bender with a cup of my Buttericano and reap the positive health effects right away.

Related posts to peruse:

  1. The Best Beef Burger Recipe
  2. Tassimo Carte Noire Voluptuoso Corse
  3. In Defense of Hunting
  4. grass-fed-fed T-Shirt
About A.B. Dada

A.B. Dada resides in Chicago, Illinois and manages a multitude of businesses involved across a wide range of industries.

Comments

  1. Jonathan says:

    Pic looks like Diarrhea-in-a-Cup.

    Not sure I can move from heavy cream to butter. Mental block I’m sure. Though drinking pure melted butter isn’t much of a problem. Tastes better drinking butter off the plate that is left after eating a smothered steak.

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